Hayes Lake State Park Snapshot Tour

Welcome to the Hayes Lake State Park virtual tour! Stay awhile at a park cabin, campsite, or walk-in campsite. You’ll enjoy beautiful views of Hayes Lake and plenty of opportunities for fishing and swimming during your stay. We hope it prompts you to visit the park in person sometime soon.


Photo of the boat ramp and wooden dock which provide access to Hayes Lake.
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Boat Access

A boat ramp and wooden dock provide access to Hayes Lake for a day of fishing or sightseeing. Only electric motors are allowed on the lake so visitors can enjoy the scenery and solitude without interruption.


Photo of an accessible wooden fishing pier located in the park.
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Fishing Pier

An accessible wooden fishing pier provides anglers with the perfect spot to try their luck at catching northern pike, crappie, and sunfish.


Photo of visitors enjoying the sandy beach along Hayes Lake.
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Beach

Enjoy an afternoon with family or friends at this sandy beach along Hayes Lake.


Photo of a screened-in picnic shelter located near the beach.
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Picnic Shelter

This screened-in picnic shelter near the beach is a wonderful place for group get-togethers. The shelter has electricity and can be reserved by contacting the park office. A grassy, open area with picnic tables, fire rings, and swings for the kids provides a great spot to spend the afternoon.


Photo of Grefthen Bay scenic overlook located on Hayes Lake.
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Grefthen Bay Overlook

This beautiful overlook on Grefthen Bay is located near the park’s campground.


Photo of a floating dock that's accessed from the campground by a series of wooden stairs.
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Floating Dock

This floating dock can be accessed from the campground by a series of wooden stairs. It provides an excellent place to fish in Grefthen Bay. A keen eye may also spot loons, grebes, and herons out in the water.


Photo of one of the campsites located within the park’s campground.
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Campground

Choose from 35 campsites (18 of which are electric) within the park’s campground. Tall trees provide dappled shade over the picnic table and fire ring found in each site. A centrally located shower/restroom building is available to campers seasonally.


Photo an accessible log cabin with a bathroom and shower building nearby.
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Timberline Cabin

This accessible log cabin sleeps five and provides a great spot for a weekend getaway with family or friends. The cabin has a gas fireplace that creates a cozy atmosphere, even on chilly northern mornings. A bathroom and shower building is available nearby.


Photo of a wooden boardwalk that threads through the park’s bog.
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Bog Walk

Step onto a wooden boardwalk that threads through the park’s bog and you may be lucky enough to spot plants such as sundew, pitcher plant, and lady’s slippers. This unique area was created when Glacial Lake Agassiz retreated, leaving behind a large, flat landscape. Drainage in these areas was very poor, but the water table remained high. As a result, hundreds of square miles of land, from the park eastward, developed into muskeg and bog communities. Read interpretive panels along the boardwalk to learn more.


Photo a campsite for campers who enjoy a more quiet, rustic experience.
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Walk-In Site View

Enjoy this stunning view from one of the park’s walk-in sites. Campers who enjoy a more quiet, rustic experience will love these sites. Set-up a tent, eat a camp meal at the picnic table, cozy up to a campfire in the fire ring at night, and wake up to this beautiful view in the morning. The hike to the campsites is about 250 yards and vault toilets are available nearby.


Photo of a camper cabin located near the lake.
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Camper Cabin

Spend a night or two in this cozy camper cabin near the lake. This cabin sleeps six. A picnic table and fire ring (located just outside) provide the perfect spot to enjoy an evening campfire. A vault toilet is available nearby.


Photo of the lakeview by Cabin 3, which leads right down to the water and the cabin’s own private fishing hole!
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Lake View Near Cabin

A short path from Cabin 3 leads right down to the water and the cabin’s own private fishing hole! Campers using this cabin often dock their canoe or boat here during their stay.


Photo of a grassy group campsite which offers plenty of space to set-up tents.
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Group Camp

This group campsite is the perfect spot for scout groups or family get-togethers. The site offers plenty of space to set-up tents, a hand pump for water, fire rings, and numerous picnic tables. A vault toilet is located nearby.


Photo of the the lake and the parkland that were named in honor of A. F. Hayes, an early settler.
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Hayes Lake Dam

Hayes Lake officially became a state park in 1967. Both the lake and the park were named in honor of A. F. Hayes, an early settler of the land now included in the park. Nearby picnic tables provide an excellent place to soak in the scenery.


Photo of family graves of homesteader, Alva Hendershot, located along the trail northwest of the dam.
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Historic Site/Monument

In the early 1900s, the first homestead was established in what is now the west portion of the park. The family graves of this first homesteader, Alva Hendershot, can be found along the trail starting to the northwest of the dam. Farther down the trail, past the grave sites, the remains of the original homestead and farm can be seen.


Photo of the park office where visitors can purchase a vehicle permit, register for camping, or ask questions about the local area.
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Park Office

Visitors to Hayes Lake State Park will pass the park office where they can purchase a vehicle permit, register for camping, or ask questions about the local area. Located on the western perimeter of vast, sparsely populated wildlands within Beltrami Island State Forest, Hayes Lake State Park offers visitors recreation and access to hundreds of square miles of untamed land. Man-made Hayes Lake meets the forest edge for spectacular shoreline views.


Photo of Bemis Hill Campground is located within the Beltrami Island State Forest and managed by Hayes Lake State Park.
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Bemis Hill

Bemis Hill Campground is located within the Beltrami Island State Forest and managed by Hayes Lake State Park. The campground offers two campsites and four horse campsites, all of which are primitive. Drinking water and vault toilets are available seasonally. In winter, the campground offers an excellent sledding hill, a shelter, and access to snowmobile trails.


Virtual Tours

Hayes Lake State Park home page

Legacy Amendment logo

This program is made possible by funds from the Clean Water, Land and Legacy Amendment.