Schoolcraft State Park Snapshot Tour

Welcome to the Schoolcraft State Park virtual tour! In this journey you'll see the banks of the Mississippi and Vermillion Rivers, tall pines that grace the picnic area, and pleasant meadows in the river backwaters. You'll canoe or camp, hike or fish, and enjoy some terrific scenery. We hope it prompts you to visit the park in person sometime soon.


Photo of the wooden dock and boat ramp on the Mississippi River.
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Mississippi River Boat Launch

A wooden dock runs along the concrete boat ramp on the Mississippi River. Anglers can get their boats in the water here for excellent walleye and northern pike fishing.


Photo of red and white pines that surround the picnic area.
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Picnic Area

Mature red and white pines surround the picnic area, located near the hiking trail and the boat launch on the Mississippi River. Picnic tables and fire rings with grills are available for park visitors to use in this beautiful shaded spot.


Photo of the canoe and group camp. 3 of 11

Canoe and Group Camp

A tent is set up alongside the Mississippi River at the canoe and group camp. This camp is tents-only and accommodates up to 50 people. Vault toilets and running water are available nearby.


 Photo of the landscape on the shores of the Vermillion River.
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Vermillion River meets Mississippi River

The Vermillion River flows calmly eastward through fields until it converges with the Mississippi River in the southeast corner of the park. During the logging days, wannigans—or floating cooking shacks—were tied up along this bank to feed the lumberjacks who floated logs down the river.


 Photo of two boats pulled up on the shore near the group camp.
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Boats at Group Camp

Two boats are pulled up to the shore near the group camp. Boaters travelling along the Mississippi River often stop at Schoolcraft State Park to rest or picnic.


 Photo of the Vermillion River, banked on both sides by forest.
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Vermillion River

Water grasses grow in the shallow water of the Vermillion River, which is banked on both sides by forest. Henry Rowe Schoolcraft, the park's namesake, was said to have camped in this area on his quest to find the headwaters of the Mississippi River.


 Photo of campers using the Schoolcraft campground.
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Campground

A tent and RV are set up on this open site in the Schoolcraft State Park campground. Most of the 28 campsites are heavily wooded and shaded. There are no modern facilities in this park, but vault toilets are located nearby.


 Photo of water grasses in a marshy backwater area of the Mississippi River.
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Mississippi River Backwater

Water grasses fill this marshy backwater area of the Mississippi River. The area is surrounded by the dense pine forests that characterize Schoolcraft State Park.


Photo of the Pine Region Picnic Area, set on the shores of the Mississippi River.  
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Pine Region Picnic Area

Located just upstream of the main picnic area, the Pine Region Picnic Area is set on the shores of the Mississippi River. The picnic area is shaded and includes picnic tables and fire rings with grills.


Photo an interpretive sign explaining the history of logging in the area. 
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Lumber Country Interpretive Sign

An interpretive sign explaining the history of logging in the area sits in front of a remarkable 300 year old pine. This sign is one of eight interpretive signs found throughout the park.


 Photo of a 300 year old pine grown into a large and beautiful landmark of Schoolcraft State Park.
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300 Year Old Pine

The 300 year old pine splits into three trunks and grows tall along the banks of the Mississippi River. Left behind during logging times because its trunk was not deemed straight enough for lumber, this tree has grown into a large and beautiful landmark of Schoolcraft State Park.


Virtual Tours

Schoolcraft State Park home page

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This program is made possible by funds from the Clean Water, Land and Legacy Amendment.