Invasive Species Alert signLake Service Provider (LSP)
Program History

Laws passed by the Minnesota legislature in 2011 established the lake service provider permit and training program.  The program is one of many ways the state is working to protect its water resources from human transport of invasive species.

The laws were based largely on a 2011 report to the legislature (PDF) that summarized suggestions the DNR received from statewide stakeholder meetings focused on preventing and containing aquatic invasive species (AIS) in Minnesota.

A Brief History of the Lake Service Provider Program

2013

  • DNR offered 27 lake service provider trainings statewide.
  • In May 2013, the Minnesota State Legislature updated the LSP laws, effective July 1, 2013. The changes include:
    • expanding the LSP definition to include businesses that decontaminate, rent or lease boats, canoes or other water-related equipment. Before this change the law applied only to businesses that installed or removed equipment from state waters.
    • removing the online AIS training requirement for employees of businesses who work with boats, equipment or structures that remain on their property in the same water body.

2012

  • Beginning July 1, 2012, lake service providers were required to have a lake service provider permit and place vehicle stickers on their windshields before conducting work that includes placing or removing water related equipment from any state waters.
  • Beginning July 1, 2012, individuals who work for a service provider were required to take free online training and receive an AIS certificate.
  • DNR and Minnesota Waters staff worked together to develop lake service provider training materials and offered 45 lake service provider trainings statewide.
  • DNR launched online training for lake service provider employees.

2011

  • The Minnesota State Legislature passed new laws (Minnesota Statutes, Chapter 84D) to help prevent and manage aquatic invasive species (AIS). The laws apply to lake service providers, boaters, property owners, bait dealers and others involved with the transportation of water-related equipment.
  • Part of the new 2011 invasive species laws created a mandatory aquatic invasive species training and permit program for lake service provider businesses to help prevent the spread of AIS between waters in the state.
  • DNR staff and staff from the non-profit organization, Minnesota Waters conducted several voluntary lake service provider trainings.

2009-2010

  • DNR staff conducted several voluntary lake service provider trainings.
  • DNR worked with and provided a grant to the non-profit organization, Minnesota Waters to develop Lake Service Provider training materials and publicize voluntary training sessions around the state for 2011.
  • The DNR held four stakeholder meetings on preventing and containing aquatic invasive species in Minnesota. One of the recommendations from these meetings was to require licensing and training of lake service providers.